bea arthur

The Golden Girls Revisited

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I stitched up The Golden Girls pretty early in my entrepreneurial career. Little did I know it would be a best seller. So far, I’ve shipped this foursome to Virginia, Colorado, New York, Massachusetts, ┬áCalifornia, and multiple towns in Wisconsin. When my mom sent me a batch of linens recently, I went out on a limb and made a larger piece, which sold immediately from my Instagram post.

This leaves me to wonder, what is up with The Golden Girls? Does the show include subliminal messages that make viewers go bat shit crazy? Are the DVDs from Season One laced with crack? Is Betty White secretly practicing witchcraft to manipulate the masses into submission? Something is awry, I tell you. You heard it here first.

The Golden Girls

The Golden GirlsWas “The Golden Girls” actually cutting-edge feminist television in the form of a sitcom about four aging women? It’s hard for me to jump on that bandwagon when the four women in question represented distinct stereotypes: The Slut (Blanche), The Rube (Rose), The Hard Ass (Dorothy), and The Old Lady (Sophia). Granted, there were episodes revolving around 80s hot topics, such as when Rose thought she had AIDS. But wasn’t that just a bit silly? And didn’t it get preachy when Blanche “explained” to Rose that AIDS does not discriminate, and even a dipshit rube can contract it?

All of that aside, “The Golden Girls” was much more empowering when it was subtle. If Dorothy wants a piece of cheesecake at 2am, by God, she will have it. Not everything has to be about sex, or relationships, or death. When I think of how “The Golden Girls” fits into my life, I think of pastels, oversized double knits, and sassy retorts. For me, that’s enough “feminism” because I’m a slut, a rube, a hard ass, and an old lady – all in one. Aren’t we all?